Day Three #AFairLand: All is fair in love and courgettes

I dreamt about courgettes last night. They were marching, yes, marching, through the gates of IMMA and plonking themselves down on the courtyard with their bellies to the sky. It was so bizarre that I actually managed to wake myself up.

Ready for another day at Food School, this morning I headed in with courgettes firmly ingrained on the brain.

What’s lovely, though, is that despite this new obsession with courgettes, I feel like I’m connecting more with the team every day.

In the beginning, it was all about trying to understand what A Fair Land was all about, but even after just a few days, I think I have got a good feel for it.

Apart from the lunch, we were working on, we also moved into the curious world of flower arranging. Sounds random, doesn’t it? Well, actually there is a link.

flowers-to-be-arranged

To Grizedale, this project is such a communal experience but it’s also an artistic one. So what can enhance the dining experience apart from the gourd-shaped bowls, handmade spoons, mugs and

So what can enhance the dining experience apart from the gourd-shaped bowls, handmade spoons, mugs and benches? Flowers! Straight from IMMA’s own grounds, the arrangements themselves can be talking points for our diners, complementing the surrounding ceramics. This simple creativity is just one of the many that I’ve enjoyed over the past few days.

Straight from IMMA’s own grounds, the arrangements themselves are talking points for our diners, complementing the surrounding ceramics. This simple creativity is just one of the many things that I’ve enjoyed over the past few days.

adam-with-flower-arrangements

Another aspect that I love is how you get to see the ins-and-outs of how a museum exhibit works. Obviously, we’re not seeing all the nitty gritty bits, but the fact that we’re the ones serving lunch means that we’ve to be on the ball with things like presentation and timing.

Everything went smoother today too, we prepped, assembled, set and served diners with much more confidence. It’s a learning curve for sure, but a fun one nonetheless.

creating-vendor-food

Since we make everything onsite, we also get to see a bit of how IMMA’s residency program works and where artists stay.

IMMA’s residency provides opportunities for artists, curators, critical writers and art professionals to research and develop their practices. It supports both emerging and established professionals, working in any medium by application or invitation, and is open to Irish and international applicants.

Residents live and work at IMMA, which in turn offers the artists opportunities to meet with the public, art professionals, and the local community.

They live in converted coach houses adjacent to the main Museum building and there are eight studios available on site.

There is a communal house called the Flanker Building (that’s the one we worked in), which has five bedrooms, two kitchens, two bathrooms and can facilitate live-in wheelchair access. Find out more about it here!

dining-out-in-IMMA

After lunch, I zipped out to a talk by the Sweet Water foundation, Grizedale Arts’ collaborators.

Based in Chicago, this foundation is transforming the city by turning waste into a community resource.

If you have time, I’d recommend you check out co-founder and director of Sweet Water Foundation, Emmanuel Pratt’s lecture below.

assembling-mobile-food

Tomorrow is my last day at the Food School, but I have had a fabulous time with the A Fair Land team.

Like anything, there’s always a risk that you won’t get on with certain people or that personalities will clash, but that hasn’t been the case at all. Everyone has been incredibly personable and friendly, and everyone works as a team.

I was invited as a guest to take part in the Food School. This is a sponsored post.

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